For the Birds
As I was driving to work one day, I saw a flock of birds around 50-100.  Now, I must confess, for those
who know me, I am an avid birdwatcher and have a “Lifelist”.  A Lifelist is a lifelong list of birds that you’ve
seen and the dates and locations that you’ve seen specific birds. What was interesting about these birds
was that they kept going up and down and turning this way and that.  But, no matter which way they
turned, they all seemed to stick together.  Almost like there was an invisible thread that held them
together with each bird knowing its place.  

How do the birds know where their space ends and the other bird starts?  Why do they not simply fly into
each other?  Well, they must have good boundaries.  People need good boundaries too. There are
physical boundaries and sometimes unspoken emotional boundaries. A boundary is kind of like a fence,
organization, you can’t see a fence, but there must be some type of order there for them to fly in
formations like they do. For people, some examples of poor boundaries would be worrying about other
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